High Anxiety

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Did You Know?

  • Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States age 18 and older, or 18% of the population. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
  • Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only about one-third of those suffering receive treatment.
  • Anxiety disorders cost the U.S. more than $42 billion a year, almost one-third of the country’s $148 billion total mental health bill, according to “The Economic Burden of Anxiety Disorders,” a study commissioned by ADAA (The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 60(7), July 1999).
  • More than $22.84 billion of those costs are associated with the repeated use of health care services; people with anxiety disorders seek relief for symptoms that mimic physical illnesses.
  • People with an anxiety disorder are three to five times more likely to go to the doctor and six times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric disorders than those who do not suffer from anxiety disorders.
  • Anxiety disorders develop from a complex set of risk factors, including genetics, brain chemistry, personality, and life events.

 

Anxiety attacks aren’t always hyperventilating and rocking back and forth.  Anxiety attacks can take different forms, such as:

  • Unpredictable bouts of rage or irritability
  • Nit-pickiness (obsessive behavior, which may be part of OCD), and even a hypersensitivity to disarray, chaos, or any sort of change.
  • Fast-talking, stuttering, stumbling over words
  • Not talking at all
  • Sitting rigid, staring into space, almost seeming “zoned out”

Understanding the way our or other’s anxiety works can help the decrease the stigma and help to calm a person faster and get them out of that state.  These are just a few, but it gives an idea of the range in which attacks can come.

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